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Orchids & Their Sizes

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    The Largest Orchid

    • The tiger orchid (Grammatophyllum speciosum) is the largest orchid in the world. Found in tropical Asian jungles, the orchid grows up to more than 8 feet high and 9 feet long. This particular orchid grows multiple stems and blooms up to 400 flowers on a single plant. The flower itself is yellow with red dots forming a rough striping pattern. This orchid weighs up to 300 lbs.

    Large Orchids

    • While no orchids match the size of the tiger orchid, many are large enough to distinguish themselves without other flowers with stems reaching up to 24 inches and blooms 4 inches across. Orchid groups, such as the moth orchids, range in color from purple and pink to white and yellow. These flowers often grow in the home, as part of a floral arrangement or by themselves. Some slipper orchids are also very large and bloom in colors ranging from red, green and brown. Paphiopedilum sanderianum has petals reaching up to 3 feet in length.

    Small Orchids

    • Many species of Dendrobium orchids are tiny. They are used in the home as part of larger floral arrangements. These flowers include the antelope orchid, which blooms several inch-sized flowers on several stems. D. loddigesii is another small orchid delivering several flowers each bloom. Small blooms range from pink, purple and white to yellow, red and brown.

    The Smallest Orchid

    • Ecologist Lou Jost discovered the smallest orchid in the world in 2009. The tiny orchid is a member of the Platystele genus, but as of 2011 was classified as a species. This orchid grows in Ecuador and was discovered growing on a larger orchid species, using the other plant's roots as a nutrition supplement. The orchid blooms tiny white flowers at 2 mm across.

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